Statistics on Domestic Violence

  • Intimate partner violence made up 20% of all nonfatal violent crime experienced by women in 2001.  (Callie Marie Rennison, U.S. Dep't of Just., NCJ 197838, Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief: Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001, at 1 (2003), available at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/ipv01.pdf)
  • Intimate partners committed 3% of the nonfatal violence against men.  (Callie Marie Rennison, U.S. Dep't of Just., NCJ 197838, Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief: Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001, at 1 (2003), available at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/ipv01.pdf)
  • In 2000, 1,247 women and 440 men were killed by an intimate partner. In recent years, an intimate partner killed approximately 33% of female murder victims and 4% of male murder victims.  (Callie Marie Rennison, U.S. Dep't of Just., NCJ 197838, Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief: Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001, at 1 (2003), available at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/ipv01.pdf)
  • Access to firearms yields a more than five-fold increase in risk of intimate partner homicide when considering other factors of abuse, according to a recent study, suggesting that abusers who possess guns tend to inflict the most severe abuse on their partners.  (Jacquelyn C. Campbell et al., Risk Factors For Femicide in Abusive Relationships: Results From A Multi-Site Case Control Study, 93 Am. J. of Public Health 1089, 1092 (2003), abstract available at http://www.ajph.org/cgi/content/abstract/93/7/1089)
  • Of females killed with a firearm, almost two-thirds were killed by their intimate partners. The number of females shot and killed by their husband or intimate partner was more than three times higher than the total number murdered by male strangers using all weapons combined in single victim/single offender incidents in 2002.  (The Violence Pol'y Ctr., When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2002 Homicide Data: Females Murdered by Males in Single Victim/Single Offender Incidents, at 7 (2004), available at http://www.vpc.org/studies/wmmw2004.pdf)
  • According to the U.S. Department of Justice, between 1998 and 2002:  (Matthew R. Durose et al., U.S. Dep't of Just., NCJ 207846, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Family Violence Statistics: Including Statistics on Strangers and Acquaintances, at 31-32 (2005), available at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs/pub/pdf/fvs.pdf)
    • Of the almost 3.5 million violent crimes committed against family members, 49% of these were crimes against spouses. 
    • 84% of spouse abuse victims were females, and 86% of victims of dating partner abuse at were female. 
    • Males were 83% of spouse murderers and 75% of dating partner murderers 
    • 50% of offenders in state prison for spousal abuse had killed their victims. Wives were more likely than husbands to be killed by their spouses: wives were about half of all spouses in the population in 2002, but 81% of all persons killed by their spouse. 
  • "Physical violence is estimated to occur in 4 to 6 million intimate relationships each year in the United States."  (Rodriguez, M., Bauer, H., McLoughlin, E., and K. Grumbach. Screening and Intervention for Intimate Partner Abuse: Practices and Attitudes of Primary Care Physicians. JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. 1999;282:468-474)
  • "Nearly one in every three adult women experiences at least one physical assault by a partner during adulthood. Approximately four million American women experience a serious assault by an intimate partner during a 12-month period."  (American Psychological Association. Facts About Family Violence. American Psychological Association Web Site.)
  • "It is estimated that 2 million to 4 million US women are assaulted by a domestic partner every year. Twelve million women (25% of the female population) will be abused in their lifetime. Up to 35% of women and 22% of men presenting to the emergency department have experienced domestic violence."  (Massey, J. Domestic Violence in Neurologic Practice. Archives in Neurology. 1999;56:659-660.)
  • One in four women (25%) has experienced domestic violence in her lifetime(The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and The National Institute of Justice, Extent, Nature, and Consequences of Intimate Partner Violence, July     2000. The Commonwealth Fund, Health Concerns Across a Woman’s Lifespan: 1998 Survey of Women’s Health, 1999)
  • Estimates range from 960,000 incidents of violence against a current or former spouse, boyfriend, or girlfriend to 3 million women who are physically abused by their husband or boyfriend per year.  (U.S. Department of Justice, Violence by Intimates: Analysis of Data on Crimes by Current or Former Spouses, Boyfriends, and Girlfriends, March 1998. The Commonwealth Fund, Health Concerns Across a Woman’s Lifespan: 1998 Survey of Women’s Health, 1999)
  • Women accounted for 85% of the victims of intimate partner violence, men for approximately 15%.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief, Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001, February 2003)
  • Between 600,000 and 6 million women are victims of domestic violence each year, and between 100,000 and 6 million men, depending on the type of survey used to obtain the data.  (Rennison, C. (2003, Feb).  Intimate partner violence.  Us. Dpt. of Justice/Office of Justice Programs.  NXJ 197838. 
    Straus, M. & Gelles, R. (1990).  Physical violence in American families.  New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Publishers.
    Tjaden, P., & Thoennes, N. (2000).  Extent, nature, and consequences of intimate partner violence.  National Institute of Justice, NCJ 181867.)
  • Women ages 20-24 are at the greatest risk of nonfatal intimate partner violence.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • Between 1993 and 2004, intimate partner violence on average made up 22% of nonfatal intimate partner victimizations against women. The same year, intimate partners committed 3% of all violent crime against men.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • Separated and divorced males and females are at a greater risk of nonfatal intimate partner violence.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • Women of all races are about equally vulnerable to violence by an intimate(Bureau of Justice Statistics, Violence Against Women: Estimates from the Redesigned Survey, August 1995)
  • Average annual rates of intimate partner victimization between 1994 and 2004 are approximately the same for non-Hispanic and Hispanic females and males.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • Intimate partner violence affects people regardless of income. However, people with lower annual income (below $25K) are at a 3-times higher risk of intimate partner violence than people with higher annual income (over $50K).  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • On average between 1993 and 2004, residents of urban areas experienced highest level of nonfatal intimate partner violence. Residents in suburban and rural areas were equally likely to experience such violence, about 20% less than those in urban areas.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • Nearly 2.2 million people called a domestic violence crisis or hot line in 2004 to escape crisis situations, seek advice, or assist someone they thought might be victims.  (National Network to End Domestic Violence)
  • Studies show that access to shelter services leads to a 60-70% reduction in incidence and severity of re-assault during the 3-12 months’ follow up period compared to women who did not access shelter. Shelter services led to greater reduction in severe re-assault than did seeking court or law enforcement protection, or moving to a new location.  (Campbell, JC, PhD, RN, FAAN. Anna D. Wolf, Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, Protective Action and Re-assault: Findings from the RAVE study.)
  • Nearly three out of four (74%) of Americans personally know someone who is or has been a victim of domestic violence. 30% of Americans say they know a woman who has been physically abused by her husband or boyfriend in the past year.  (Allstate Foundation National Poll on Domestic Violence, 2006. Lieberman Research Inc., Tracking Survey conducted for The Advertising Council and the Family Violence Prevention Fund, July – October 1996)
  • Nearly 2 in 3 female victims of violence were related to or knew their attacker.  (Ronet Bachman Ph.D., U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Violence Against Women: A National Crime Victimization Survey Report," January 1994, p. iii)
  • Over two-thirds of violent victimizations against women were committed by someone known to them: 31% of female victims reported that the offender was a stranger. Approximately 28% were intimates such as husbands or boyfriends, 35% were acquaintances, and the remaining 5% were other relatives. (In contrast, victimizations by intimates and other relatives accounted for only 5% of all violent victimizations against men. Men were significantly more likely to have been victimized by acquaintances (50%) or strangers (44%) than by intimates or other relatives.)  (Ronet Bachman Ph.D., U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Violence Against Women: A National Crime Victimization Survey Report," January 1994, p. 1)
  • Almost 6 times as many women victimized by intimates (18%) as those victimized by strangers (3%) did not report their violent victimization to police because they feared reprisal from the offender.  (Ronet Bachman Ph.D., U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Violence Against Women: A National Crime Victimization Survey Report," January 1994, p. 1)
  • Annually, compared to males, females experienced over 10 times as many incidents of violence by an intimate. On average each year, women experienced 572,032 violent victimizations at the hands of an intimate, compared to 48,983 incidents committed against men.  (Ronet Bachman Ph.D., U.S. Department of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, "Violence Against Women: A National Crime Victimization Survey Report," January 1994, p. 6)
  • Battered women seek medical attention for injuries sustained as a consequence of domestic violence significantly more often after separation than during cohabitation; about 75% of the visits to emergency rooms by battered women occur after separation.  (Stark and Flitcraft, 1988).
  • About 75% of the calls to law enforcement for intervention and assistance in domestic violence occur after separation from batterers. One study revealed that half of the homicides of female spouses and partners were committed by men after separation from batterers.  (Barbara Hart, Remarks to the Task Force on Child Abuse and Neglect, April 1992)
  • Twenty years ago, the first battered women's shelter in the United States, Women's Advocates, was opened in St. Paul, Minnesota. This program is still in existence today.  (NCADV VOICE Spring, 1994)
  • There are 1,500 shelters for battered women in the United States. There are 3,800 animal shelters.  (Schneider, 1990).
  • Each year, medical expenses from domestic violence total at least $3 to $5 billion. Businesses forfeit another $100 million in lost wages, sick leave, absenteeism and non-productivity.  (Domestic Violence for Health Care Providers, 3rd Edition, Colorado Domestic Violence Coalition, 1991.)
  • It is estimated that 25% of workplace problems such as absenteeism, lower productivity, turnover and excessive use of medical benefits are due to family violence.  (Employee Assistance Providers/MN)
  • Violence is the reason stated for divorce in 22% of middle-class marriages.  (EAP Digest November/December 1991)
  • From 1983 to 1991, the number of domestic violence reports received increased by almost 117%.  (NYS Division of Criminal Justice Services, 1983 and 1991)

 

Domestic Violence Homicides

  • On average, more than three women and one man are murdered by their intimate partners in this country every day. In 2000, 1,247 women were killed by an intimate partner. The same year, 440 men were killed by an intimate partner. Intimate partner homicides accounted for 30% of the murders of women and 5% percent of the murders of men.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics Crime Data Brief, Intimate Partner Violence, 1993-2001, February 2003. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • Most intimate partner homicides occur between spouses, though boyfriends/girlfriends have committed about the same number of homicides in recent years.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, Intimate Partner Violence in the U.S. 1993-2004, 2006.)
  • The health-related costs of intimate partner violence exceed $5.8 billion each year. Of that amount, nearly $4.1 billion are for direct medical and mental health care services, and nearly $1.8 billion are for the indirect costs of lost productivity or wages.  (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Costs of Intimate Partner Violence Against Women in the United States, April 2003.)
  • About half of all female victims of intimate violence report an injury of some type, and about 20 percent of them seek medical assistance.  (National Crime Victimization Survey, 1992-96; Study of Injured Victims of Violence, 1994)
  • Thirty-seven percent of women who sought treatment in emergency rooms for violence-related injuries in 1994 were injured by a current or former spouse, boyfriend or girlfriend.  (U.S. Department of Justice, Violence Related Injuries Treated in Hospital Emergency Departments, 1997)

Read an article about Women Impacted By Domestic Violence

Read Domestic Violence Facts about Ohio

Read National Domestic Violence Facts

Read even more National Domestic Violence Facts

Read about Understanding Intimate Partner Violence

CDC - Intimate Partner Violence Prevention

 

Domestic Violence in the Workplace Statistics

National Cost of Domestic Violence

  • The health-related costs of rape, physical assault, stalking, and homicide by intimate partners exceed $5.8 billion each year. 
  • Of this total, nearly $4.1 billion is for victims requiring direct medical and mental health care services.
  • Lost productivity and earnings due to intimate partner violence accounts for almost  $1.8 billion each year.
  • Intimate partner violence victims lose nearly 8.0 million days of paid work each year - the equivalent of more than 32,000 full-time jobs and nearly 5.6 million days of household productivity.

Your Corporate Peers

  • 68% of senior executives surveyed agreed that their company’s financial performance would benefit from addressing the issue of domestic violence among its employees.
  • 94% of corporate security directors rank domestic violence as a high security risk.
  • 78% of Human Resource Directors identify domestic violence as a substantial employee problem.
  • 56% of corporate leaders are personally aware of specific employees who are affected by domestic violence.
  • 60% of senior executives said that domestic violence has a harmful effect on their company’s productivity.

The Human Factor

  • 85-95% of all domestic violence victims are female. 
  • Over 500,00 women are stalked by an intimate partner each year.
  • 5.3 million women are abused each year.
  • 1,232 women are killed each year by an intimate partner.
  • Domestic violence is the leading cause of injury to women.
  • Women are more likely to be attacked by someone they know rather than by a stranger.

Domestic Violence in the Workplace

  • Homicide is the leading cause of death for women in the workplace.
  • Of the approximately 1.7 million incidents of workplace violence that occur in the US every year, 18,700 are committed by an intimate partner: a current or former spouse, lover, partner, or boyfriend/girlfriend.

Of Battered Workers:

    • 96% experience problems at work due to abuse
    • 74% are harassed while at while at work 
    • 56% are late to work   
    • 28% leave work early 
    • 54% miss entire days of work

(Copyright © 2001 American Institute on Domestic Violence)

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