Statistics on Teen Dating Violence

  • Nearly three in four tweens (72%) say boyfriend/girlfriend relationships usually begin at age 14 or younger.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008.)
  • 62% of tweens (age 11-14) who have been in a relationship say they know friends who have been verbally abused (called stupid, worthless, ugly, etc) by a boyfriend/girlfriend. (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008.)
  • Only half of all tweens (age 11-14) claim to know the warning signs of a bad/hurtful relationship.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008.)
  • More than three times as many tweens (20%) as parents (6%) admit that parents know little or nothing about the tweens’ dating relationships.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2008.)
  • 1 in 3 teenagers report knowing a friend or peer who has been hit, punched, kicked, slapped, choked or physically hurt by their partner.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • Nearly 1 in 5 teenage girls who have been in a relationship said a boyfriend had threatened violence or self-harm if presented with a break-up.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • 13% of teenage girls who said they have been in a relationship report being physically hurt or hit.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • 1 in 4 teenage girls who have been in relationships reveal they have been pressured to perform oral sex or engage in intercourse.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • More than 1 in 4 teenage girls in a relationship (26%) report enduring repeated verbal abuse.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • 80% of teens regard verbal abuse as a “serious issue” for their age group.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • If trapped in an abusive relationship, 73% of teens said they would turn to a friend for help; but only 33% who have been in or known about an abusive relationship said they have told anyone about it.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study on teen dating abuse conducted by Teenage Research Unlimited, February 2005.)
  • Twenty-four percent of 14 to 17-year-olds know at least one student who has been the victim of dating violence, yet 81% of parents either believe teen dating violence is not an issue or admit they don't know if it is an issue.  (Survey commissioned by the Empower Program, sponsored by Liz Claiborne Inc. and conducted by Knowledge Networks, Social Control, Verbal Abuse, and Violence Among Teenagers, December 2000)
  • Less than 25% of teens say they have discussed dating violence with their parents.  (Liz Claiborne Inc. study of teens 13-17 conducted by Applied Research and Consulting LLC, Spring 2000)
  • 89% of teens between the ages of 13 and 18 say they have been in dating relationships; forty percent of teenage girls age 14 to 17 report knowing someone their age who has been hit or beaten by a boyfriend.  (Children Now/Kaiser Permanente poll, December 1995)
  • Nearly 80% of girls who have been physically abused in their intimate relationships continue to date their abuser.  (City of New York, Teen Relationship Abuse Fact Sheet, March 1998)
  • Of the women between the ages 15-19 murdered each year, 30% are killed by their husband or boyfriend.  (City of New York, Teen Relationship Abuse Fact Sheet, March 1998)
  • Studies show that at least one in ten teens will be in an abusive relationship.
  • In abusive relationships between boyfriends and girlfriends, 95% of the time it's a boyfriend abusing a girlfriend.
  • It's not easy to leave an abusive relationship at any age. It's even harder for teens to leave abusive relationships because of fewer resources and uninformed adults who think it's "just two kids fighting."
  • Abuse happens in all different kinds of relationships, including same sex/same gender relationships.
  • Teen dating violence can happen to anyone no matter what his or her race or where they live.
  • Police, counselors and schools can be messed up about racism or sexual orientation and sometimes don't provide the same support to all kids and young adults. (www.bradleyangle.org)
  • In 2002, close to 1.7 million teenagers (ages 12 to 19) were victims of violent crime. More than 1.4 million of those were physically assaulted, almost 124,000 were raped/sexually assaulted, and nearly 115,000 were robbed.
  • Persons ages 12 to 19 experienced all violent crimes at rates higher than other age groups in 2002.
  • Persons ages 12 to 19 were raped/sexually assaulted at rates higher than any other age group.
  • In a study of lifetime prevalence of four types of violence, researchers found that almost 40 percent of American adolescents witnessed violence, 17 percent were victims of physical assault, 9 percent were victims of physically abusive punishment, and 8 percent were victims of sexual assault.
  • Three in four American adolescents who were sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well. Thirteen percent of sexual assaults were reported to police, 6 percent to child protective services, 5 percent to school authorities, and 1.3 percent to other authorities. Eighty-six percent of sexual assaults went unreported.
  • Six in ten American adolescents who were physically assaulted were assaulted by someone they knew well. Sixty-five percent of physical assaults were never reported. Most of those reported were reported to police (17 percent) or school authorities (16 percent).
  • The lifetime prevalence of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) among American adolescents ages 12-17 who have experienced sexual assault is 28.2 percent for boys and 29.8 percent for girls (compared to 5.4 percent for boys and 7.1 percent for girls who have not been sexually assaulted). Among physically abused adolescents, the lifetime prevalence of PTSD is 15.2 percent for boys and 27.4 percent for girls (compared to 3.1 percent and 6 percent, respectively, for adolescents with no history of physical abuse).

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